4749
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Goat’s Peak Hike

Where:

  • Goat’s Peak

 

When:

  • July 2, 2021

 

Who:

  • Ed, Zac

 

Trailhead:

  • from Kelowna head south on Highway 97 for 20 minutes through West Kelowna towards Peachland
  • just after the turnoff for 97C and just past the overpass, take the left turn onto Seclusion Bay Road
  • shortly along this road where it connects with Seclusion Bay Road coming from Peachland, the parking lot is on your left-hand side
  • the trailhead is out the far end of the parking lot at the metal gate

 

 

Degree of difficulty:

  • 350 meters of elevation gain
  • 7  km out and back
  • the trail starts at a metal gate along a double-wide gravel road for a km where it forks up a single track path
  • it is clearly marked with metal placards along the entire trail, but there are a few turns that are not well marked, so it’s best to download a GPS map (we missed a turn on the way down that added a half km to the journey and some additional climbing)
  • good hiking shoes/boot treads are recommended due to the steepness and loose shale
  • the hike took us just under 2 hours, and we moved at a reasonably leisurely pace

 

 

Interesting notes:

  • Goat’s Peak is very open without much shade, so it was very hot in the 25C weather
  • the trail name comes from the Angora Goats that the Gellatly family raised and let roam in this area (softest, fluffiest goats in the world)
  • the designated trail names are translated into nsyilxcen, which is the language of the sylix/Okanagan people
  • there are panoramic views up and down Lake Okanagan and across the lake to Okanagan Mountain Park and Mount Boucherie
  • we saw a bald eagle sitting in a tree near the top on the way up and scouring in the sky on the way down
  • there are also Western Rattlesnakes in the area (only rattlesnake in B.C. and one of three remaining species in Canada)